Applied Behavior Analysis Graduate Program

Two students examining patient files.

Spark positive behavior in others

Earn a master’s degree in applied behavior analysis. You can change the world for people who need it most.

Work with children and adults who have autism, mental health and other behavioral issues. Lead positive behavior changes.

Graduate ready to take the national exam and become a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

Degree options

Degree plan

Traditional master's

Review a sample schedule that details your path to graduation.

Degree plan

Accelerated master's

Earn two degree in less time. Start on your master’s degree as you finish your bachelor’s degree.

Why earn a master’s degree in applied behavior analysis at Missouri State?

Student examining patient photos and a graph.

Be ready for certification

This program helps you become a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). Through course work and experience, you’ll be eligible to take the BCBA national certification exam.

Student helping her student in class.

Develop your style

Grow your skills through clinical experiences and an arranged practicum. Be qualified and prepared to help people who have disabilities or autism.

Student examining an object.

Suitable for any background

This two-year, 39-hour program is open to anyone with a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university or college. You don’t have to be a psychology or special education major to gain admission.

Behavior analyst speaking to child.

Enjoy broad career options

With your degree, you can go beyond the traditional applied practice setting. You can address behavior problems in areas like business, government, health, animal training and more.

Student studying on her computer.
Careers and outcomes

Explore your potential career paths

Enhance lives through behavior. Gain highly marketable skills for a growing health care field.

Verified Course Sequence pass rates: Unavailable

VCS pass rate data is not published for the following sequences:

  • Fewer than six first-time candidates in a single year.
  • Sequences within their first four years of operation.